Online Practice with Opening Leads

Online Practice with Opening Leads

BeB, Defense, Leads. In most situations, LHO will lead the 4th card from their longest unbid holding against a NT contract. That is, LHO will not lead a long suit if that suit were bid by Declarer. If two suits have the same length, then LHO will lead the stronger suit (eg, one with a tenace). If Declarer has not bid Stayman, then LHO should prefer a lead in a major suit. If the contract is NT slam, then LHO should not underlead a suit containing a single honor. Continue reading Online Practice with Opening Leads

Developing Defensive Signals

Developing Defensive Signals

ACBL, Hearts, Ch6. Defenders should never allow Declarer to win the last trick or tricks in a suit developed by Defenders. As Will Rogers might say, if the last trick isn’t a winner for Defenders, then Defenders shouldn’t “buy” it. Instead, Defenders duck one or more of the previous tricks so that Declarer “buys” or wins the early tricks. Defenders lose tricks early if necessary to maintain entry to their long hand. Once the tricks are established, Defenders can run them (“buy” them in our analogy). Continue reading Developing Defensive Signals

Preemptive Opening Bids

Preemptive Opening Bids

BB2, Ch1. A normal bridge opening requires 13-21 points. With a fit from Partner, the team moves to game and scores 400 to 620 points at duplicate. A preemptive bid is different in that the point requirements are lower. The bidder values their hand much like in the early days of bridge, looking for high-card tricks (HCT) and low-card tricks (LCT). A hand that can take approximately 5 tricks, can hope for Partner to provide one more trick, and is willing to sacrifice by going down 2 tricks is a hand suitable for preempting at the 2 level (ie, declaring for 8 tricks). Continue reading Preemptive Opening Bids