Making a Defenders’ Plan

Making a Defenders’ Plan

ACBL, Hearts, Ch8. If one Defender is establishing a long suit, that Defender may not have enough entries to run the suit once it is established. While the second Defender still has cards in partner’s suit, the second Defender should win any trick possible, and return a card in the first Defender’s long suit. Second Defender should win even when such play is counterintuitive, such as not playing 2nd Hand Low. Winning in the short hand will accomplish two things — it will help establish the first Defender’s long suit, and it will preserve the first Defender’s entries. Continue reading Making a Defenders’ Plan

Online Practice with Opening Leads

Online Practice with Opening Leads

BeB, Defense, Leads. In most situations, LHO will lead the 4th card from their longest unbid holding against a NT contract. That is, LHO will not lead a long suit if that suit were bid by Declarer. If two suits have the same length, then LHO will lead the stronger suit (eg, one with a tenace). If Declarer has not bid Stayman, then LHO should prefer a lead in a major suit. If the contract is NT slam, then LHO should not underlead a suit containing a single honor. Continue reading Online Practice with Opening Leads

Interfering with Declarer

Interfering with Declarer

ACBL, Hearts, Ch7. Declarer deserves all their trump tricks in hand. Defenders are not hurt by Declarer ruffing anything in hand. Consequently, when Dummy is long, a Defender on lead should continue a suit knowing that partner and Declarer are void. Declarer will get a ruff, but partner will get a sluff. Partner will sluff whichever suit Dummy is short. When Declarer creates a ruff in Dummy’s short suit, the short Defender will be able to overruff. Continue reading Interfering with Declarer

Developing Defensive Signals

Developing Defensive Signals

ACBL, Hearts, Ch6. Defenders should never allow Declarer to win the last trick or tricks in a suit developed by Defenders. As Will Rogers might say, if the last trick isn’t a winner for Defenders, then Defenders shouldn’t “buy” it. Instead, Defenders duck one or more of the previous tricks so that Declarer “buys” or wins the early tricks. Defenders lose tricks early if necessary to maintain entry to their long hand. Once the tricks are established, Defenders can run them (“buy” them in our analogy). Continue reading Developing Defensive Signals